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01.20.10

New Opinions on Mono, Miguel de Icaza, and the “Windows Stratagem”

Posted in Free/Libre Software, GNU/Linux, Microsoft, Mono, Novell, Windows at 6:26 pm by Dr. Roy Schestowitz

Miguel de Icaza
Miguel de Icaza, Microsoft MVP

Summary: More perspectives arrive in response to a technical/legal analysis of Moonlight and Miguel de Icaza’s highly-deserved Microsoft MVP award

A DAY ago we wrote about Richard's analysis of Moonlight, which Jason from Mono-Nono responds to as follows:

Will we now hear The H’s author decried as a “zealot” or ”fearmongerer” for pointing out de Icaza’s obsession with emulating and promoting Microsoft technologies? Or, perhaps, a word of apology for painting RMS in such lights for his equivalent statement?

I suspect the latter shall not happen, though some may call me a cynic.

Moonlight can be used, at least in the short term, if you have obtained your software through Novell. Otherwise, you are cast adrift in a no man’s land where it is not always apparent what is permissible and what is not.

Even though I think the author is too kind here, I am also pleased that he is not merely parroting the (failed) attempt by Team Moonlight to pretend that the new “Covenant” is some sort of improvement over the old – which was downright offensive in the first place.

[...]

[T]he Mono developers have appeared to gain strength and unity from adversity and see themselves as united against the rest of the world.

This is the most brilliant insight of the article, and it articulates something I have long found fascinating. Team Mono has a core of supporters that are simply not interested in the truth or discussion. They will adopt (and endlessly repeat) any argument that they think supports their cause, and they will immediately dismiss any argument with any means that they think supports their opposition.

The Mono and Moonlight proponents/developers are acting like an extension of Microsoft, almost like a cult. Who would be this cult’s leader? To quote a brand new comment from ZDNet:

Miguel de Icaza, Microsoft MVP?

Yep, it’s true. The open-source rabble-rouser who was prevented from hosting a session inside Microsoft’s 2005 Professional Developer Conference has been accepted into the ranks of the company’s “Most Valuable Professionals” less than five years later. He announced the news on his blog.

De Icaza is the leader of the open-source Mono project, sponsored by Novell, which previously set off alarm bells inside Microsoft for its ability to expand Microsoft .NET applications to other platforms, including Linux. Relations between de Icaza and Microsoft have warmed following the Redmond company’s partnership with Novell.

He’s also on the board of the Microsoft-supported CodePlex Foundation, Meanwhile, Mono spin-off project Moonlight, an open-source implementation of Microsoft’s Silverlight interactive technology, has won the blessings of the Redmond company.

One of our regular readers has just caught up with the news about Miguel de Icaza’s Microsoft MVP award [1, 2]. He asks us: “Please decode his reference to “ECMA CLI”, and is the other end of the OS spectrum missing this and why would ‘Windows developers’ want to know about it?”

Any takers in the comments?

He concludes with: “I guess this is more of the let’s get ‘open source’ onto Windows stratagem. What could be more open than that?”

“I would love to see all open source innovation happen on top of Windows.”

Steve Ballmer, Microsoft CEO

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36 Comments

  1. TheTruth said,

    January 20, 2010 at 7:22 pm

    Gravatar

    and WINE does not try to emulate Microsoft technologies.

    It’s FUNNY (in a pathetic kind of way) that ive read the GPLv2 and GPLv3 and nowhere have I seen in it that Microsoft or ANY other company is not allowed to contribute to the GPL as long as they comply with the terms of that license.

    Even a non-GPL free license, does not restrict any company from contributing, so why is it hard for you to understand that simple FACT,,, ROY.

    DO you need it explained to you by someone, draw you a picture. Is you’re level of understanding that low ?

    Oh thats right, you dont contribute code at all, so you dont need to understand the GPL you just have to parrot you’re hate talk, and show you’re never ending loves and adoration to Stallman.

    So show me where in the GPL is says MS is not allowed to contribute, or any individual, or group ?

    Just because YOU dont like a group, or person, does not mean the community feels the same way, and has nothing to do with the progress of FOSS, it’s all about a way for you to deliver you’re hate talk, and propaganda.

    At least no one cares about you’re bile and hate, and it’s ok that you will remain a joke of oss.

    and someone willing to damage oss for you’re own ego trip.

    powered_by_tux Reply:

    I find it funny that you start talking about the GPL when Roy did not mention it a single time in this article. Also, I am excited to know where you misunderstood him that companies can not make use of the GPL. You can certainly source this, right?

    Nobody is excluded from complying with the GPLv2 or v3, not even Microsoft. In fact, there would be a lot less of trouble if projects such as Mono would be put under the v3 license as that would rule out the nebulous patent threat. But Microsoft will not do that since it means giving up control of their projects.

    Since you were also asking how Microsoft is excluded from using the GPL, then have a look here: http://www.gnu.org/licenses/rms-why-gplv3.html
    While not really excluding anyone, a mayor intention of the v3 is to prevent using patent threats to collect royalties for using GPLed software which MS/Novell are actively doing right now. But since Microsoft is not out to do this and just wants to help the dear FOSS developers writing better software on Linux with totally no bad intentions at all, why aren’t they embracing the GPLv3?

    Well, the rest of your post is your personal notionI beg to differ by stating that I DO care what Roy has to tell. Certainly, anybody may have a different position on this. Now, I’m expecting to get flamed as well.

    Dennis Murczak Reply:

    Erm… where exactly in the article is the mention of the GPL you relate to? And what makes you think Roy doesn’t understand its most basic principles?

    Most importantly, why do you call him a joke while acting like a clown? A very awkward thing to do if you like to be taken serious.

    Roy Schestowitz Reply:

    “TheTruth” is “Mutex”, who has used almost 50 other names in the IRC channel of Boycott Novell in order to attack people in a very vulgar way. He should be reported to the Web police, not fed.

    By the way, he hates Linux and Free software.

  2. Bertrand said,

    January 21, 2010 at 2:24 pm

    Gravatar

    The full quote from Miguel’s blog :
    “This [C# MVP Award] will be a great opportunity to build more bridges with Windows developers and show them that there is an ECMA CLI life in the other side of the OS spectrum.”

    ECMA CLI is the Common Language Infrastructure standard, accepted by the ECMA organization (http://www.ecma-international.org/publications/standards/Ecma-335.htm). It’s the basis of the .NET platform.

    I think what Miguel has in mind is a scenario like this :
    A developer who only created great applications for the Windows platform learns that a MVP says that applications written in C# could run on Linux. The MVP even provides a tool to help identify issues with porting (http://mono-project.com/Moma). This developer does a little work to fix these issues, if any, then install Linux to test his application, realizes it’s a great OS and becomes a fan of Free Software.

    your_friend Reply:

    He could just use Java and be a fan of free software. Listening to what Microsoft MVPs say is a bad idea.

    Bertrand Reply:

    My scenario wasn’t really clear on that point : I was thinking about already existing applications written in C#.

    I think translating in a different language is a bit more than “a little work”.

    Roy Schestowitz Reply:

    In practice we find the opposite.

    Bertrand Reply:

    That is one specific example.

    Personally, I’m a counter-example of that : I’m a FLOSS contributor and developer thanks mostly to the existence of Mono.

    JohnD Reply:

    Save your breath Bertrand I already tried to explain this concept on this site to no avail. To me the consensus here is that adding .Net technology will somehow pull current/future FOSS developers to the Dark Side (i.e. Microsoft) rather than create new ones. Or if it does create new FOSS developers all their code will be “tainted” by MS IP and MS will sue everyone that developed using .Net stuff thereby destroying FOSS.
    Overall the BN supporters are idealists who think that FOSS will eventually take over the industry because it’s “the best way” . I also had someone tell me once that FOSS doesn’t need the support of the corporate world or even average computer users. Linux etc will succeed regardless.

    Roy Schestowitz Reply:

    Free software does not need “help” from companies. These companies happen to be using the software (it “helps” them because it’s good) and making addition to it for personal use; the GPL ensures that improvements to Linux, for example, return to the main branch (upstream).

    Another excellent example is Apache.

    Dennis Murczak Reply:

    .Net was originally conceived to battle Java on the Windows platform. On any other platform it is pretty much a solution in search of a problem; there are already standardized language bindings to all C libraries, so why add an additional layer in form of a common language runtime?

    Regarding FOSS as a power in the industry, you will find that Linux and the accompanying software ecosystem is pretty much standard when you look at the whole market for computing devices, not just the old-fashioned desktop niche.

    JohnD Reply:

    And my point is proven.

    Dennis Murczak Reply:

    The mere fact that someone has an opinion differing from yours doesn’t prove anything.

    JohnD Reply:

    What I make a statement that someone feels a certain way about something, and then a person comes out an says that they feel that way. I’ll consider it proof.

    your_friend Reply:

    The statements you have made reflect only your own confusion, conflicting goals and malice. Boycott Novell has made a reasonable argument that Mono is a patent trap. They have also pointed out that .NET itself is a poor performer, and most people who have used it will agree. Surely it’s a waste of time to learn a poorly performing language when free ones do the job better. Why do you feel the need to “waste your breath” insulting “idealists” here? Why bother to promote Mono if corporate sponsorship is so useful? Surely the backing of a powerful company like Microsoft is all you need to make Mono a success. The practical result of your kind of success can be seen right now in the Windows world.

    Mono is a half measure that appeals to neither practical people nor idealists. If you don’t care about software freedom, buy a copy of Vista and quit worrying about mono. The practical results of software freedom are equally apparent. If you care about performance or freedom, get yourself a nice GNU/Linux distribution and forget all about mono. C, C++, Java and other free languages fill everyone’s need for cross platform and RAD programming.

    JohnD Reply:

    My goals are not conflicting, nor have I have expressed malice. I seldom agree with Roy’s conclusions but I’ve never resorted to anything close to insults or malice. If I feel that Roy’s conclusions are questionable, I not only say it, but I include why I feel the way I do.
    Roy is a big fan of disclosure so for your edification – I use Linux on my laptops. I also investigate FOSS options for software and I use Netbeans for Java development. Besides downloading a VM of Mono just to take a peek at it, I’ve never used it and don’t really intend on using it. So to say I “promote” Mono is inaccurate to say the least. Based upon what Bertrand put in his post it seems to me that he has some experience in the corporate world. I’m guessing that he learned that business’ don’t always make decisions for the “right” reasons. It seems to me that Bertrand looks at Mono the same way I look at it, a way to ease the transition from Windows to Linux for developers who have probably never done any development on a non-Windows platform.
    Contrary to what you may believe about me, I understand the concerns that have been posted here and elsewhere about the “patent traps” . I see the POTENTIAL for issues whereas most BN supporters view them as FACTS. As I’ve stated on here before – absolute devotion to either proprietary or free hurts everyone. The best solution in my opinion is compromise. I do feel that software patents are stupid and that copyrights make more sense. If someone wants to spend the time writing a program so he/she can sell it in order to make a living – they should be allowed to do it. If they want to keep it closed, that should be their right. If they want to give it away or open the source – that should be their right as well. You start losing freedom the second you start imposing limits.

    Roy Schestowitz Reply:

    Is there a Web page with a list of companies that used a .NET/ASP/Windows combo and swapped it for Mono/GNU/Linux (to run the same programs)?

    verofakto Reply:

    Roy, I believe JohnD has disclosed his affiliations to you at some point. As ‘your_friend’ seems to be falling into the usual pattern of attacking people who disagree with you, wouldn’t it be appropriate to disclose to him who he’s talking to?

    It would be a shame for him to find out through other channels – after all, you have claimed in the past that you ‘loathe’ people who use multiple accounts.

    your_friend Reply:

    This is an old and tired mirror attack. People advocating software freedom are somehow violating people’s rights and ability to earn a living! What interesting news in a world where people are earning billions of dollars developing, using, even selling free software. It is funny how often non free software makers accuse free software advocates of everything that non free software is about, exclusion, lack of choice and general control freakery. The only people violating anyone’s ability to do anything with computers are the makers of non free software.

    You start losing freedom the second you start imposing limits.

    No, you lose your freedom when you surrender it or have it taken from you. Non free software owners seek to remove freedom by force and have people believe they surrendered it freely. Many of the forceful means are already crimes and reducing that kind of “freedom” is the job of the criminal justice system. There are many restrictions on the use and sharing of Mono components, those who agree to those restrictions have less freedom than those who make more reasonable language choices.

    Mono is a case of throwing good time after bad. Windows developers who are interested in software freedom should move to free software platforms and learn free languages. It takes less time, works better and leaves Microsoft where Microsoft belongs. It is nice to have frameworks for legacy code, but developing new applications in mono is a waste of time. As Microsoft collapses, it’s time for people to admit they bet on the wrong horse for the wrong reasons and learn the hard lesson of their mistakes. People who try to export non free software models onto free software are doomed to the same dissapointments seen in the non free Unix and Windows worlds.

    JohnD Reply:

    @verofakto: The “secret” is safe because I have neither the time nor the inclination to go rooting around to figure out who is whom. If someone doesn’t have the spine to pick an id and stick with it – they really aren’t worth my time. I have freely admitted that I’m a CNE and I informed Roy not long ago that my “interests” in Novell amount to a whopping 50 shares of stock.
    While I disagree with most of Roy’s conclusions about Novell and what will happen in the industry – he has a right to have and voice them.
    What burns my butt the most is when people claim that all software should be free so people can do what they want with it, and then start crying foul when people start using it in a way they don’t like. Maybe Mono is the biggest hunk of crap since Windows (all versions – except maybe 2000), but if someone wants to use it – let them have at it.

  3. NotZed said,

    January 21, 2010 at 11:56 pm

    Gravatar

    “I think what Miguel has in mind is a scenario like this :”

    Perhaps he does – but I really can’t believe someone could be so naive (still). I would be curious if there was a single case-study where a significant deployment of was moved from .NET to mono on linux desktops (starting on mono doesn’t count).

    Initially it was all about leveraging a ‘great platform’ for GNU/Linux application development, but it seems it has just turned into ‘cloning .net’. As everyone with half a brain always realised it would.

    This is a losing strategy. If anything all it does is re-enforces the whole “linux == hobbyist toy” mentality. Yes you can play on linux if you want, but when you’ve ready to grow up it’s time to move to the real thing.

    I know a couple of c-hash devs, and they suffer no illusions – mono is always behind, incomplete, and simply not worth their time.

  4. JohnD said,

    January 22, 2010 at 12:10 am

    Gravatar

    We both know that Mono/.NET is new to game and the tools are still fairly immature when compared to existing tools. It also hasn’t really had time to gain traction.
    I don’t know if there are any sites that list changes like that, because I haven’t looked. There might just be some out there, but I can’t really see the average company taking the time to announce to the world that they made the switch. And just because there isn’t a website out there, it doesn’t mean that it hasn’t happened. I never suggested that people would switch en masse just because Mono now supports .NET. What I have said is that if you’re targeting corporate developers, the direction Mono has taken makes sense.
    What I haven’t really seen from BN supporters is the understanding of just how much money a corporation invests in a platform. You’re not just talking about software licenses, you’re talking about the developer time, not just to create the programs, but to support them along with the time and effort of those people outside the IT department who help create it. Developer training and learning curve in order to get them to a high level of proficiency. This can be a massive expenditure made over a long time. A free OS and development tools isn’t going to come close to offsetting the investments that have already been made. In order for the company to truly go “free” from licensing and IP issues they will have to convert all their developers (so they don’t lose all the knowledge) and then start working on how to recreate everything they have so it doesn’t infringe. Try explaining to the CEO why he should approve spending the money to replace something the probably already works well enough to get the job done.

    NotZed Reply:

    “We both know that Mono/.NET is new to game and the tools are still fairly immature when compared to existing tools. It also hasn’t really had time to gain traction.”

    It isn’t just the time, it just isn’t needed, nobody is interested outside of a few small ISV shops and a bunch of guys paid to work on it.

    “What I haven’t really seen from BN supporters is the understanding of just how much money a corporation invests in a platform.”

    Well, time will weed these companies out – they are intentionally putting themselves at a competitive disadvantage if they are spending so much money locking themselves in. It might take while and do a lot of damage in the mean time though.

    I mean how stupid is it to invest in this ‘massive expenditure’ when they are relying on the good-will of another company which almost certainly not have their best interests in mind?

    What you’re describing there is ‘vendor lock-in’, which is costly way of doing business, and one that only `works’ whilst everyone is paying the rentiers (it’s not a tax, it’s a private pay-to-play rent). Damn the massive cost to society in lost productivity and extracted rent in the meantime.

    As soon as someone can escape the rentiers this business model is toast – which we are in the midst of right now – which is why there’re throwing everything behind patents and ACTA and the like to make sure they prevent this progress.

    Free isn’t about the price, it’s about the freedom, and you provided a perfect example of just why it is so much more important than just ‘open source’ (== free developers ).

    As for CEO’s – well come on, if any CEO is interesting in anything other than their own hip pocket nerve, i’d be mightily impressed. Make a fast buck stealing shareholder profits, go on a few junkets, jump ship with a golden parachute. They stick with microsoft or oracle because they get to go to the cricket or rugby and get free drinks at ‘conferences’ – they really don’t give a shit what the poor plebs on the floor are using, so long as they get some personal kickbacks. Microsoft isn’t about developers, it’s about bribing the ones who spend the real money – and well, that’s one thing they can be admired for executing on (revolting as it is).

    your_friend Reply:

    If this is true:

    We both know that Mono/.NET is new to game and the tools are still fairly immature when compared to existing tools.

    People should use java and other mature but free tools. You keep going in circles around this. If it’s not to promote mono, what are you doing?

    JohnD Reply:

    @NotZed: The point I think you’re missing is that the investments have already been made. Most of corporate America got themselves under the Microsoft thumb YEARS ago, most of them when they switched from Netware to Windows. One of the biggest reasons for the switch was that it was easier to write software for a Windows server than it was to write code for a Netware server. They could save money by writing their own stuff. Once companies make that kind of investment they are loath to give it up. It goes back to the old adage, if it’s not broken don’t fix it. Right now they don’t have to worry about IP infringement issues, because they are MS customers. They already have stuff that works and to change it will require spending tons of money to reinvent the wheel. They will spend that money elsewhere before they spend it on IT. Traditional IT is considered a cost center, not a profit center. This means IT costs the company money without generating revenue. Sales is considered a profit center because money spend on them usually results in more revenue – if you have a good sales staff.
    We can both rail about the evil that is corporate America/World, but things aren’t going to change in the short term.

    your_friend Reply:

    Sticking with Microsoft and .NET are big money losers for any company. Microsoft infrastructure costs companies money in poor performance and security as well as direct software costs. Moving to the same under Mono is not a solution, using existing superior tools under GNU/Linux is. The London Stock Exchange is a great example of the benefits of a move to free software. They bought a .NET mess at tremendous cost against the advice of everyone with a clue. The thing never worked well and have expensive failures. It was replaced with a normal gnu/linux system at 1/10 the original cost.

    JohnD Reply:

    Where your example fails is that the London stock exchange didn’t get a system that worked. Most companies that have invested in MS software do have systems that work so there’s no reason to spend money just to switch the platform.

    your_friend Reply:

    Microsoft and “work” should not exist in the same space. I have yet to see a Microsoft deployment that works well. Over the last 15 years, I’ve worked in fortune 100 companies, university research labs and small companies, all with the finest Microsoft IT money can buy. All of them had the same problems and none of them can compare to the normally serene environment and functional I’ve been able to make for myself with free software. .NET is even worse than previous generations. The only difference between the London Stock Exchange and other .NET deployments is that LSE members demanded better. Some people just keep on “working” with garbage. Please don’t tell me it’s cheaper to keep that kind of second rate software around.

    This technical suckdom, legal and technical sabotage, are the source of the condescention, perhaps hostility, you see from people who have had enough. Those who know better don’t want to sit through mono promotions.

    It’s time to give up mono. I admire and respect the technical ability of the mono developers, but think their talent is horribly wasted. I do not admire or respect .NET users who are too lazy to learn more portable languages. The move to .NET, from what I’ve seen, has always been some kind of top down driven stupidity. I pity those caught up in it but implore them to do better for themselves. GNU/Linux jobs are hot right now and will be for the forseeable future as Microsoft continues to implode.

    JohnD Reply:

    There are lots of reasons why companies will stick with software that “isn’t the best”. Among those reasons are ego – whomever drove the project doesn’t want to admit they made a mistake. So they will throw good money after bad in an effort to save face. Accounting is another reason. If a company has spent millions on say an AS/400 system, they probably won’t depreciate it all in one year. They will opt to take it out over several in an effort to offset future income – same thing for software. The bug is, if you toss it all – you can’t continue to depreciate it. So they will hold on to the old system until it’s worthless on paper. I also find that most people don’t give much thought to how much has to be done in order to accomodate a major software redesign/platform shift. Very seldom can a company just dump the old stuff and start on a new system in the same day. Most require parallel systems for at least a short while to make sure everything works as planned. So for a company that’s locked up with MS they will have to build the entire Linux infrastructure that will be needed to support the development process, then train developers and then start the actual development process. All of the above is after all the meetings that have to be held to determine the best way to go. In short, it’s not easy or cheap to say MS sucks we’re going in a new direction.
    From what I’ve experienced the negative response I get is often from people who feel they have the right answer for everyone. They have labeled something as bad therefore there can be no acceptable reason for using the “bad” thing. In some ways it’s easy to be an idealist, because you don’t have to take time to understand anyone else’s situation. An idealist has determined what is right and anything else is wrong. Keeps things simple. I consider myself a realist because I learned a long time ago there isn’t a one size fits all solution for anything on this planet. Just because I don’t see a need for something doesn’t mean that it won’t be useful for someone else. If people are tired of hearing Mono promotions – then stop listening to them, don’t get involved in discussions about it. I’m all for debate, but if the participants can’t be civil to each other and willing to honestly listen to opposing view points – the debate is pointless.
    If you think Mono is a waste, that’s fine but it doesn’t mean it will be a waste for everyone. I’m sure there are a lot of developers who don’t want to move away from what they are comfortable with – that’s human nature. The majority of the world’s population has some level of resistance to change of any kind. I would also ask you to consider that many developers may WANT to learn other languages, but lack the time and possibly the resources to do it. I’m married with one son, a dog, and my own business. I don’t have time to learn half of what I want to learn. In the current business climate most small companies can’t afford to make a major switch of their systems – they just don’t have the money to do it. Someone posted in here something like open == free developers. That’s true to an extent, but most of those “free developers” have a day job that pays them the money they need to live. There are A LOT of people who are afraid of losing their jobs so they can’t afford to “rock the boat” and stay true to their ideals.

    your_friend Reply:

    If this is true:

    GravatarWe both know that Mono/.NET is new to game and the tools are still fairly immature when compared to existing tools. It also hasn’t really had time to gain traction.

    People should use java and other mature tools. You keep going in circles around this. If you are not doing it to promote mono, what are you doing?

    JohnD Reply:

    I’m not going around in circles, you’re not taking the time to understand what I’m putting in my posts.
    What I’m asking for is let people choose the tools they want to use, even if the language is “bad”. Does C# or .NET make Linux better? Probably not. Is C# or .NET needed on Linux? It depends on your situation. If you already have a boat load of stuff written in it, then yeah you could argue that Mono is needed so you don’t have to reinvent the wheel. You can start the the process of getting out from under vendor lock in by changing the server that runs the existing code.

    your_friend Reply:

    Only Microsoft would prevent what you ask for. There is nothing wrong with having a framework for legacy code to help people get away from a non free OS. Microsoft does its best to make that impossible by making changes to .NET and by maintaining “the right to sue” and alternately threatening and cajoling. Software should not have owners if for not other reason than the owner could be as awful as Microsoft is.

    People here at BN only point these things out and warn people not to make new code or otherwise depend on Mono. There’s no point at all in making a new photo manipulation tool, for example, in a language that only barely works and is loaded with patent threats. It’s even more foolish to replace free software success stories like GIMP with mono built software.

    JohnD Reply:

    If only that were true, I have been berated on BN for just what I’ve asked for. Some BN supporters do not simply inform about potential issues.
    This posting is a perfect example, I was met with outright hostility and only after a few posts am I told that there’s nothing wrong with wanting a legacy framework. Just because you don’t see the point behind another photo manipulation tool doesn’t mean that the person writing it doesn’t have a good one – at least in their mind. If it’s good other people will use it, if not it will fail.
    There’s a big difference between informing people and actively trying to prevent the creation/inclusion of software just because you disagree with it’s usefulness.
    Is there potential for MS to pull a fast one with Mono? Sure, but realistically a lot of the people using Mono and C# are probably already covered because they built it all with correct licenses on Windows. Mono IP infringement should be a non-issue for .NET shops looking at running their code on Linux instead of Windows. It also happens to be a perfect way to begin to erode MS cash flow.

    clayclamp Reply:

    a language that only barely works

    Can you qualify this, please. It seems a mighty big statement coming from someone who has admitted in the past (I believe) that he’s not a developer.

    I don’t have an issue with the patent FUD you people spread around Mono, although I disagree with it. But _technical_ claims like those should be backed up with some evidence. Since none of you seem to be developers, maybe you can get someone else to back up the “barely works” part. That would be acceptable as well.

  5. Mikko said,

    January 22, 2010 at 12:48 pm

    Gravatar

    why can’t paint.net run on mono ?

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  9. How Patent Lawyers Analyze Alice v. CLS Bank

    Breaking down a patent lawyer's analysis of a Supreme Court's decision that seemingly invalidated hundreds of thousands of software patents



  10. Is It Google's Turn to Head the USPTO Corporation?

    The industry-led USPTO continues to be coordinated by some of its biggest clients, despite issues associated with conflicting interests



  11. The EPO's Public Relations Disaster Amid Distrust From Within (and EPO Communications Chief Leaves): Part VII

    Amid unrest and suspicion of misconduct in the EPO's management (ongoing for months if not years), Transparency International steps in, but the EPO's management completely ignores Transparency International, refusing to collaborate; the PR chief of the EPO is apparently being pushed out in the mean time



  12. Links 18/10/2014: Debian Plans for Init Systems, Tails 1.2

    Links for the day



  13. Links 18/10/2014: New ELive, Android Expansion

    Links for the day



  14. Another Fresh Blow to Software Patents (and With Them Patent Trolls)

    Another new development shows that more burden of proof is to be put on the litigant, thus discouraging the most infamous serial patent aggressors and reducing the incentive to settle with a payment out of court



  15. Links 16/10/2014: New Android, SSL 3.0 Flaw

    Links for the day



  16. How the Corporate Press Deceives and Sells Microsoft Agenda

    Various new examples of media propaganda that distorts or makes up the facts (bias/lies by omission/selection) and where this is all coming from



  17. Vista 10 is Still Vapourware, But We Already Know It Will Increase Surveillance on Its Users and Contain Malicious Back Doors

    The villainous company which makes insecure-by-design operating systems will continue to do so, but in the mean time the corporate press covers only bugs in FOSS, not back doors in proprietary software



  18. Links 15/10/2014: KDE Plasma 5.1 is Out, GOG Reaches 100-Title Mark

    Links for the day



  19. With .NET Foundation Affiliation Xamarin is Another Step Closer to Being Absorbed by Microsoft

    Xamarin is not even trying to pretend that separation exists between Microsoft and its work; yet another collaboration is announced



  20. The EPO's Protection Triangle of Battistelli, Kongstad, and Topić: Part VI

    Jesper Kongstad, Benoît Battistelli, and Zeljko Topić are uncomfortably close personally and professionally, so suspicions arise that nepotism and protectionism play a negative role that negatively affects the European public



  21. Corporate Media Confirms the Demise of Software Patents in the United States; Will India and Europe Follow?

    It has become increasingly official that software patents are being weakened in the United States' USPTO as well as the courts; will software leaders such as India and Europe stop trying to imitate the old USPTO?



  22. Links 14/10/2014: CAINE 6, New RHEL, Dronecode

    Links for the day



  23. Microsoft's Disdain for Women Steals the Show at a Women's Event

    Steve Ballmer's successor, Satya Nadella, is still too tactless to lie to the audience, having been given --through subversive means -- a platform at a conference that should have shunned Microsoft, a famously misogynistic company



  24. SCOTUS May Soon Put an End to the 'Copyrights on APIs' Question While Proprietary Giants Continue to Harass Android/Linux in Every Way Conceivable

    Google takes its fight over API freedom to the Supreme Court in the Unites States and it also takes that longstanding patent harassment from the Microsoft- and Apple-backed troll (Rockstar) out of East Texas



  25. Patent Lawsuits Almost Halved After SCOTUS Ruling on 'Abstract' Software Patents

    The barrier for acceptance of software patent applications is raised in the United States and patent lawsuits, many of which involve software these days, are down very sharply, based on new figures from Lex Machina



  26. Links 13/10/2014: ChromeOS and EXT, Debian Resists Systemd Domination

    Links for the day



  27. Links 12/10/2014: Blackphone Tablet, Sony's Firefox OS Port

    Links for the day



  28. Links 9/10/2014: Free Software in Germany, Lenovo Tablets With Android

    Links for the day



  29. Links 8/10/2014: A Lot of Linux+AMD News, New ROSA Desktop Is Out

    Links for the day



  30. Lawyers' Propaganda About Software Patents and a New AstroTurf Entity Called Innovation Alliance

    Patent propaganda and deception from patent lawyers (among other parasites such as patent trolls) continues to flood the Web, intersecting with reports that prove them totally wrong


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